The Israelites in their wilderness saw God, they saw his incredible miracles and they still doubted. I don’t see God, is he talking to me at all?

Three weeks ago I began reading the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy. Aside from skimming over the details for the building and presentation of the Arc of the Covenant and the Tabernacle, I read it as closely as I could. I underlined, I made notes, I asked questions, and I discussed it with a person who knows the scriptures better than most (my mother). I wasn’t surprised by the violence; ancient cultures are known to have been barbaric. The strangeness of the plagues God used to expel his people from Egypt didn’t astonish me for I have known this story since childhood however, I found myself in awe of the constant complaints and failure of the Israelites. I came to understand that Exodus and Deuteronomy are not only about how God rescued his people from slavery, it is a record of how the Israelites kept getting it wrong. And in their failure, this record stands as example of God’s perfect and loving grace. 

I was dumbstruck to learn that within days of fleeing Egypt many Israelites (or Hebrews as they were known as at the time) doubt God’s deliverance and wish to return to slavery for ‘its better to be a slave in Egypt than a corpse in the wilderness’ (Ex 14:12). I could not believe that even after they witness the extraordinary parting of the red sea, experience God providing care, food and water for them in the wilderness, and seeing God’s daily guidance and protection manifest in a pillar of cloud in the day and a pillar of fire at night, they still doubt! Can you believe that before the first year is out they even take their jewelry and form a carved idol, which they then celebrate with a big party declaring that idol to be the god who brought them out of Egypt? (Ex 32:1-8) How did these people forget him so quickly? Did they have amnesia? 

In 2020, thousands of years after these events, it’s easy to judge the Israelites. They had physical proof that God was with them! They witnessed miracle after miracle! They were guided daily by God who even went ahead of them and chose the best campsites for them to dwell in (Duet 1: 32-33), but they still didn’t trust the Lord God! And here we are in May 2020 never having seen, or likely to ever see, anything remotely like this, yet we are still asked to put our trust in him? They had it so easy! So much easier than us. God appeared to them, time and time again, but there are probably millions of Christians today who don’t even believe that God has ever, or will ever, communicate with him. To him, he’s a distant God, not an interventional God, but one still worth believing him. When comparing us to the Israelites at the time of the Exodus with a God that so obviously showed up, it is difficult to comprehend their mistrust of him. Worse, when God after a short time takes them to the Promised Land and tells them to enter it, they refuse in fear. They still do not trust him. Their failure in this resulted in another forty years in the wilderness!

I wonder, what would my belief have looked like if I was among the Israelites? Would I have given my jewelry to be melted down and made into an idol? Would I have failed at the tests God gave them? Tests that God had already provided the answer for? What about you? Do you think you would have trusted him? When overlooking for the first time the land that God had promised to give them, all they had to do was enter and take it, instead they let their own fear and worry consume them. By not trusting and obeying God, they missed the blessings he had prepared for them and they were ordered back into the desert to learn again what God had already taught them – ‘Trust me and I will provide for you’.

Covid-19 and the enforced isolation that comes with it, feels (and looks) like a wilderness. It is unknown, it is mundane, it is a place a fear and loneliness, it is something all of us wish to turn away from. But I must wonder are God’s blessings, his provision and his very presence in this Coronavirus desert too? This may be a time of unprecedented change, worry, sickness and grief (don’t forget boredom too) but it can also be a time of trust, peace, faith and understanding. We may not have pillars of clouds or fire to guide us but God has already provided guidance for us in his word. 

The bible isn’t a book about God’s commands, punishment and law, it’s a book expressing God’s grace and unfailing love to a people who continually failed him. It’s a book that can be a light upon our path as we walk through these days. It is a book with a personal message of hope for you and I, if we decide to take the time to read it. The more I read it, the more I can see that God’s plan was, and will always be, good for those who put their trust in him. What will you discover?

 The wilderness the Israelites experienced destroyed many of them. My prayer for you and I is that this wilderness called Covid-19 and all the stress and discomfort it brings will not be a time of failure to trust, or a failure to hope or a lack of wanting to seek God, but rather a time of growth and blessing as we search for and rest in his comfort and guidance…as we seek him – the God who wants us to remember the miracles he did to rescue his people, knowing that one day when our time to be on this earth would come about that we would be blessed by what he did then.  I wonder, was King David thinking of the Exodus when he wrote Psalm 25:6 ‘Remember O Lord, your compassion and unfailing love, which you have shown from ages past.’ His love, the same love that dragged a stubborn people out of slavery so that he could honor his promise and bless them, is the love that God still has for his people, all people today.  Just now to trust him. 

“Remember how the Lord your God led you through the wilderness for these forty years humbling you and testing you to prove your character, and to find out whether or not you would obey his commands…He did it to teach you that people do not live by bread alone; rather, we live by every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord” 

Deuteronomy 8:2-7 NLT

Is it just me or does isolation feel like a wilderness?

I wanted to start this blog off with a brief look at The Lords Prayer (what a better way to start, right?) however, I feel that Exodus 16 is just as good a place as any.  

Give us today our Daily Bread

Just four weeks after God rescues the Israelites from slavery in Egypt by a series of miracles, including separating the waters of the Red Sea so that they could walk through on dry land, the Israelites are disturbed to find themselves in the wilderness. They don’t like their situation at all and complain to Moses and Aaron about it (Moses being the guy who God appointed to lead them out of Egypt, and Aaron his right hand man). In their opinion it would have been better for God to have killed them in Egypt than be out here in the wilderness. There in Egypt, they had pantries full of food and could eat all the meat and bread they wanted. Here, they are in fear of starvation: ‘How could Moses (and ultimately God) do this to us!’ (Exodus 16:3)

Hearing the people’s complaints against him, God tells moses that he will rain food down from heaven. He says that in the evening they will have meat to eat and in the morning they will have all the bread they want. In doing this God’s intention is clearly stated, ‘Then you will know that I am the Lord your God.’ 

Exodus 16:13-14 says ‘that evening vast numbers of quail covered the camp’ (the meat) and the next morning an edible flaky substance as fine as frost covered the ground. The Israelites called this Manna (literally meaning ‘what is this?). It tasted like honey wafers and they were able to bake with it.  In the middle of nowhere, in times unprecedented to them, as they wandered and wondered what all of this could mean, God provided for them. 

I find it remarkable that even though they had just witnessed (and forgotten) God’s miracles in their escape from Egypt, and had been reassured that he had heard their cries of oppression as he remembered his Covenant promise to their forefather Abraham (another story that sets in motion how God sets apart the Israelites to be his people), the Israelites still needed a daily reminder that He remains their God. Daily, they failed to trust him and daily, he reminded them of his power and grace. By taking them into the wilderness he saved their lives and there he waited and watched for them to grow in trust toward him. He didn’t want them to to just enter the promised land and then forget about him (like he knew they would). He wanted their hearts and minds set on him, no matter the frightening wasteland they found themselves in.

In answering their complaints, God’s grace and compassion towards them meant that every morning the Israelites woke up to an encounter with God. He was there. The Manna on the ground wasn’t just food, it was a daily reminder, a daily encounter, a daily miracle so they would know that he is their God and He is with them always. Should we then, expect that as we pray for our Daily Bread, that we should be expecting an encounter with God? Yes! I wonder, is that what Jesus meant in The Lords Prayer, that we pray for God to show himself to us every day, that he in fact is the Daily Bread? Of course Jesus said something that strongly hints to this, ‘Man shall not live by bread alone but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God’ (Matthew 4:4 – and Jesus got this from Deuteronomy 8:3) 

I don’t know what you personally are going through. I do not know what lies ahead of you, what lies ahead of all us. But I do know and believe this: God is in this moment. He is here and he promises to meet the needs of all those who trust in him.  And in this moment, He wants to show himself to you, to reveal more of his love for you. In calling you to trust him during the darkest time our generation is yet to know, he desires for you to feel peace and to be hopeful.  In providing daily for us, and as we encounter him and his great works daily, he wants us to not be afraid, to not worry but to give thanks for what has has already done, and what he will do for us. Then, when we can do that, we can be the light of hope for our families and communities. #bethelight